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Dewey the library cat : a true story
2010
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  Publishers Weekly Review

Librarian Myron's popular adult memoir, Dewey: The Small Town Library Cat Who Touched the World, about the adopted cat who became the mascot of her Iowa library, finds yet another life in this middle-grade adaptation, which also follows Myron and Witter's 2009 picture book version. At its core, the story-Spencer Public Library staff and patrons rally around the tiny ginger-colored kitten abandoned in the book drop on a freezing winter's night-remains as heartwarming as ever. Young animal lovers, especially, will enjoy learning about how the cat, Dewey Readmore Books, endeared himself to library visitors (he was always happy to receive a petting or to nap on welcoming laps) and how his fame spread nationally and beyond U.S. shores thanks to profiles in various cat publications. Myron's friendly and pleasantly pragmatic voice, as well as her mostly judicious selection of anecdotes, brings poignancy to the tale of her special bond with Dewey. Her story also offers readers another bit of insight into how animals and humans can emotionally enrich each other's lives. Ages 8-12. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

  School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-Myron's best seller about the resident cat at the Spencer Public Library in Iowa has been adapted for middle grade readers. The references to most of the author's personal problems, which peppered her adult book, have been removed, and Dewey's story stands on its own. The anecdotes remain the same, with some concessions made to the experiences of younger readers: explaining, for instance, who Alf and Spuds McKenzie were, or pointing out that "back in the day" TV cartoons were only seen on Saturday mornings. Dewey's special brand of "pay-it-forward" love has immense appeal, and fans of animal stories will immediately gravitate toward the book, with its handsome reproduction of the feline's now-famous portrait on the cover. As Myron's anecdotes show, the joy and comfort that Dewey provided to countless patrons over 18 years was not something that could be cataloged, or indexed, or highlighted in a trustee's report. But it was real and evident to the staff and library regulars. Dewey will no doubt have young readers pining for their own library cats, but astute readers will also pick up on the message that a town's heart beats strongest in its library.-Kara Schaff Dean, Walpole Public Library, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summary
In the tradition of Marley: A Dog Like No Other , this is the story of a cat who was more than a pet, and the amazing effect he had on the people around him. This middle-grade adaptation of the Grand Central bestseller Dewey features an 8-page photo insert, including exclusive, never-before-seen photos of the Dew!<br> <br> Now everyone's favorite library cat can inspire a new audience of young readers with his story of courage and love. Abandoned in a library book drop slot in the dead of winter, this remarkable kitten miraculously endured the coldest night of the year. Dewey Readmore Books, as he became known, quickly embraced his home inside Spencer's public library, charming the struggling small town's library-goers, young and old. As word of Dewey's winning tail, or rather his tale, spread, the library cat gained worldwide fame as a symbol of hope and proof positive that one small cat could change a town, one reader at a time.
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